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Latest rffada and FASD News

Media and Research Roundup

FASD News Roundup May 2010

I Australian News

  1. Welcome and thank you to Associate Professor Heather Douglas (T C Beirne School of Law, The University of Queensland)
  2. Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Service FASD Project
  3. Good News Story from a teacher of students with FASD
  4. Media article - Fitzroy Crossing kids traumatised
  5. Telethon Institute for Child Health Research “Alcohol & Pregnancy Project” Update
  6. Alcohol and Pregnancy and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Resources for Health Professionals
  7. DASSA Library has copy of ADHD & FASD by Kieran O’Malley
  8. Fitzroy Valley FASD/ELT Strategy Update

II International News & Media Articles

  1. First European Conference on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
  2. Free University of Minnesota FASD Online Training Course
  3. The 4th International Conference in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
  4. CDC’s new FASD website
  5. Psychiatric Training in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders “Inadequate”
  6. New book about FASD by 11 year old Child
  7. Irish Medical Organisation calls for Health Warnings on alcoholic beverages
  8. Russia Will Require Labels on Alcohol

III Latest FASD Research

  1. Reversal of Alcohol-Induced Learning Deficits in the Young Adult in a Model of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
  2. New research helps explain the underlying mechanism behind alcohol’s effects on the developing fetus.
  3. Prevalence of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Much Higher than Previously Estimated
  4. Examining mathematical abilities in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder
  5. Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) have a number of cognitive deficits
  6. Racial Disparities in Pregnancy-related Drinking Reduction
  7. New screening tool helps identify children at risk for developmental issues.
  8. Problems Expressed by Caregivers of Children With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
  9. “Impact of a social skills intervention on the hostile attributions of children with prenatal alcohol exposure”
  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Outcomes From a Comprehensive Magnetic Resonance Study of Children With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
  11. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and the criminal justice system
  12. Missing Connections: FASD Research
  13. Rewards of Parenting a Child with a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
  14. Brain Regions Damaged By Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Identified By Water-Diffusion Technology
  15. Behavioural Training Improves Connectivity and Function in the brain

I Australian News

1. Welcome and thank you to Associate Professor Heather Douglas (T C Beirne School of Law, The University of Queensland)

NOFASARD would like to take this opportunity to both welcome and thank Associate Professor Heather Douglas for agreeing to be part of our network and assist us in an informal way on the occasions when a legal issue arises. Heather researches in the areas of criminal law and legal history. She is particularly interested in the relationship between Indigenous people and the criminal law and the way the criminal law impacts on and constructs women. She has also explored the work of Justice Martin Kriewaldt, the sole judge of the Northern Territory Supreme Court during the 1950s. Her writing has been published in Canada, Europe and Australia. Heather was a part-time commissioner with the Queensland Law Reform Commission from 2001-2007. In 2004 Heather was a visiting scholar at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford University. Heather currently teaches Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure and Evidence. In 2005, Heather won an award for teaching excellence. One of Heather’s most recent papers is 'The Sentencing Response to Defendants with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder', Sentencing 2010, Canberra 6 February, 2010 available online.

Professional Development Programs by Year (PDF)

2. Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Service FASD Project

Penny Bridge FASD Project Coordinator and Josie Ward, the Miriwoong FASD Project Worker have been making fantastic headway in the areas of FASD education and promotion. These include:
  • A comprehensive education and screening program run in conjunction with the OVAHS Child and Maternal Health Unit to provide FASD education to all OVAHS ante natal clients.
  • FASD education is also being provided to all Indigenous women in the community of child bearing age (13–45 years).
  • FASD education also continues for the staff at OVAHS with a number of staff completing an internationally recognised online FASD screening course enabling staff to have an in-depth understanding of FASD and with the long term view of OVAHS referring clients to the visiting paediatricians for assessment.
  • FASD health promotion is also being developed to target men in the community through community public awareness activities.
  • Links with local government and non-government agencies including KDHS, the Crisis Centre and Community Health are being forged to improve FASD prevention and promoting contraception.
  • Strong links are also being formed with National and International FASD groups and initiatives to ensure inclusion in the current groundswell of FASD awareness both nationally and overseas.
  • Development and production of culturally appropriate locally produced FASD resources such as leaflets, posters and a 15 minute DVD are close to completion and we look forward to the opportunity of sharing these with you in the not too distant future.
Please contact either Penny or Josie if you would like any further information on the FASD project. pennyb [at] ovahs [dot] org.au

3. Good News Story from a teacher of students with FASD

“I would like to share a very proud moment with you. On awards day 4 of my most at risk boys — I believe quite significantly affected by FASD — bravely and confidently stood up in front of everyone and played a guitar, drums and keyboard and sang a favourite song. After lots of tough days and years of support and nurturing of the gorgeous kids, to see them shine was one of my proudest moments ever. I'm going to miss them all so much. Just had to share it!!!”

Thank you to this wonderful teacher for sharing this most poignant story with us!!

4. Media Article — Fitzroy Crossing kids traumatised

Western Australia's Commissioner for Children, Michelle Scott, expressed disbelief at a lack of services in the isolated town, where pediatricians estimate at least a quarter of children were affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

View the full story on at The Australian

5. Telethon Institute for Child Health Research “Alcohol & Pregnancy Project” Update

In 2009 we completed a series of focus groups in Perth with pregnant women, mothers and fathers of young children, and women who might soon become pregnant. Through these focus groups we developed and tested some preliminary concepts for advertisements about alcohol use during pregnancy. This resulted in identifying several concepts that appeared to have the most potential for effectively modifying women’s use of alcohol during pregnancy.

In 2010 we will be conducting a survey to test these new advertising concepts with a sample of approximately 400 women. Our aim is to quantify which of these advertising concepts would be most effective in increasing women’s intentions to abstain from alcohol and reduce alcohol intake during pregnancy, and when planning a pregnancy.

Should you have any queries or comments, please contact the Project Manager, Kathryn France on k [dot] france [at] ecu [dot] edu.au or (08) 6304 5518.

6. Alcohol and Pregnancy and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Resources for Health Professionals

These resources are still available as hard copies from the Telethon Institute for Child Health WA and may be ordered and mailed to you (free of charge) or downloaded from our website.

7. The DASSA Library has a Copy of ADHD & FASD by Kieran O’Malley

The Drug & Alcohol Services (SA) Library has recently purchased this highly acclaimed book — a must read for service providers in the health, mental health, drug and alcohol, education and child welfare sectors. DASSA is a public access library and anyone can join up to borrow. The book may not come up on their search engine but you can contact the library at

161 Greenhill Road, Parkside, 5063
ph +61 8 82743318 email: ros [dot] taylor-parkins [at] health.sa [dot] gov.au

8. Fitzroy Valley FASD/ELT Strategy

Attached please find the most recent update for the Fitzroy Valley FASD/ELT (Early Life Trauma) Strategy, (called ‘Marulu’ which is a Bunuba word meaning ‘precious,worth nurturing’) It discusses the background and potential benefits of a FASD prevalence study and the community consultation in October 2009.

II International news and media articles

1. First European Conference on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

To be held in the Netherlands from November 3 to 5, 2010. The conference will be hosted by the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Foundation of the Netherlands.

For more information or to submit an abstract, see http://www.eufasd.org/EN/conf_en.php. If you have questions, e-mail Diane Black at info [at] eufasd [dot] org.

2. Free University of Minnesota FASD Online Training Course

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD):

3. The 4th International Conference in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Conference Date: March 2-5, 2011

This 4th International conference will provide an advanced forum for emerging and cutting edge research, policy and practice that will assist governments, service systems, service providers, parents and caregivers, as we strive to address the complex issues of FASD. This new knowledge will be an impetus for critical action in supporting women, individuals, families, and communities around the world.

View the Advance Notice

4. CDC’s new FASD website

www.cdc.gov/fasd Some of the new features of the site include:
  • A video called, “The Story of Iyal”. It gives an inside look at one family living with FASDs.
  • Easy-to-read information on diagnosis and treatments for children with FASDs
  • Individualized pages for different visitors — women, families, healthcare providers, educators, and partners

5. Psychiatric Training in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders “Inadequate”

Deborah Brauser — November 4, 2009 (Honolulu, Hawaii) — Psychiatric training in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) is “inaccurate and inadequate,” a national survey of psychiatric trainees reveals.

Presented at the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 56th Annual Meeting, the survey showed although 40% of respondents reported receiving supervision with a patient with suspected or confirmed FASDs, 70% reported never diagnosing a patient with an FASD, and 51% reported they had never treated a patient with the condition. In addition, a total of 83% reported they had never used any standardized diagnostic schema at all.

"Results from our study show that FASDs are underrecognized by psychiatry trainees, representing missed opportunities for prevention and intervention," lead investigator Roy Eyal, MD, from the Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior at the University of California–Los Angeles, told Medscape Psychiatry.

Full report at medscape.com

6. New book about FASD by 11 year old Child

Morasha Winokur, 11, is the author of 'My Invisible World.'

Morash’s mother describes her daughter as “an old soul.”?She’s 11 years old but has the sharp sense of awareness and honesty of someone many times her age. In her new book, "My Invisible World – Life with a Brother, His Disability and His Service Dog," Morasha discusses a rarely talked about condition, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). Morasha’s uses her book to blatantly and poignantly express what her life is like having to live with someone with FAS in the family.

http://ypwr.blogs.cnn.com/

7. Irish Medical Organisation calls for Health Warnings on alcoholic beverages.

www.imn.ie/index.php/current-issue/news/2482-imo-calls-for-alcohol-warnings IMO calls for alcohol warnings

8. Russia Will Require Labels on Alcohol

Moscow Times – State will require labels on alcohol

III Latest FASD related Research

1. Reversal of Alcohol-Induced Learning Deficits in the Young Adult in a Model of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Obstetrics & Gynecology

February 2010 – Volume 115 – Issue 2, Part 1 – pp 350–356

View article – journals.lww.com

2. New research helps explain the underlying mechanism behind alcohol’s effects on the developing fetus.

“This is a new and exciting area where instead of studying the sequence of the genes, we are looking at the mechanisms that control our genes – known as epigenetics”. Dr Chong is hopeful her team’s research will further our understanding of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and in the future these epigenetic changes may be used to aid diagnosis of this condition, allowing for early intervention.

Article at serval.qimr.edu.au

3. Prevalence of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Much Higher than Previously Estimated

A comprehensive new study published in the journal Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews finds that Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) in populations of younger school children may be as high as 2–5% in the United States.

www.nofas.org/news/FASDPrevalence.aspx

4. Examining mathematical abilities in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-11/ace-ema111209.php

5. Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) have a number of cognitive deficits

Article on 7thspace.com

6. Racial Disparities in Pregnancy-related Drinking Reduction

Leigh E. Tenkku; Daniel S. Morris; Joanne Salas; Pamela K. Xaverius; Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2009;13(5):604-613. ©2009

7. New screening tool helps identify children at risk for developmental issues.

ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 14, 2009, from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091207123759.htm

8. Problems Expressed by Caregivers of Children With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Linda M. Caley, PhD, RN, Theresa Winkelman, MS, SNP, RN, and Kathleen Mariano, DNS, RN, CPNP International Journal of Nursing Terminologies and Classifications Volume 20 Issue 4, Pages 181 – 188

9. "Impact of a social skills intervention on the hostile attributions of children with prenatal alcohol exposure"

Keil V, et al Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2010; 34(2): 1–11.

10. Social cognitive and emotion processing abilities of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: a comparison with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Rachel L. Greenbaum, Sara A. Stevens, Kelly Nash, Gideon Koren, and Joanne Rovet. (July 2009).Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research (ACER). 33(10):1656–1670.

11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Outcomes From a Comprehensive Magnetic Resonance Study of Children With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

Astley, SusanJ. - Aylward, ElizabethH. - Olson, HeatherCarmichael - Kerns, Kimberly - Brooks, Allison - Coggins, TrumanE. - Davies, Julian - Dorn, Susan - Gendler, Beth - Jirikowic, Tracy - Kraegel, Paul - Maravilla, Kenneth - Richards, Todd. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research (ACER). 33(10): pp 1671 – 1689

12. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and the criminal justice system

Diane K. Fast, Julianne Conry

Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews Volume 15 Issue 3, Pages 250 – 257

13. Missing Connections: FASD Research

The research of neuroscientist Dr. Brian Christie at the University of Victoria has shown that exercise can actually stimulate new brain cell growth, and a study in Oceanside hopes to help prove it can re-develop the neurons missing in the brains of FASD children to help their brains develop.

www.bclocalnews.com/vancouver_island_central/parksville_qualicumbeachnews/news/70234982.htmlM

14. Rewards of Parenting a Child with a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Authors: Jason D. Brown, Susan Rodger, Natalie George, David St. Arnault, Jennifer Sintzel. The Open Family Studies Journal Volume 1 [2008] pp.23–30 (8)

15. Brain Regions Damaged by Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Identified By Water-Diffusion Technology

www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/115612.php

16. Behavioural Training Improves Connectivity and Function in the brain

Children with poor reading skills who underwent an intensive, six-month training program to improve their reading ability showed increased connectivity in a particular brain region, in addition to making significant gains in reading, according to a study funded in part by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). The study was published in the Dec. 10, 2009, issue of Neuron. This NIH News Release is available online here.

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